Anyone visiting Buxton Press for the first time is usually struck first and foremost by the frontage, the main entrance being a magnificent stone archway which hints at the origins of the original building.

In 1877, when William Cavendish was the 7th Duke of Devonshire, plans to build a coaching house and stabling on what is now the Buxton Press site were submitted by the Devonshire estate. The proposals indicated a coach house, substantial stables, courtyard and superb buildings which formed a coaching arch and offered accommodation including an office, parlour, kitchen and six bedrooms.

With the subsequent arrival of the railway, the need for stabling dwindled and in 1915 plans were submitted by the Devonshire estate for the proposed conversion of the stables into a printing and binding works – the forerunner of Buxton Press!

The printing business flourished and was eventually purchased from the Devonshire estate in the early 1950's as the “Buxton Printing Company” which by then specialised in leather case-binding and textile publications. 

Over time, this opened the doors for further exciting opportunities in magazine printing allowing growth in that sector and shaping the direction of the business of today. Under the ownership of the Galloways, Buxton Press has gone from strength to strength. Winning PrintWeek’s much coveted Printing Company of the Year Award an unprecedented five times – and benefiting from significant capital investment, including a recent spend in excess of twenty million pounds – has established Buxton firmly on the map as one of the most modern printing companies in its sector, the timeline of Buxton Press showing successive year on year growth.

Although over the years growth has inevitably necessitated change to the overall structure of the building, retaining the integrity and character of the original facade has been of paramount importance and today the double fronted construction showcasing the magnificent coaching archway stands proud and looks just as it did all those years ago.